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the federal law they're much more common in the state's that don't do much of the gun shows and in the state's generating some publicity i heard that open air market that i've shown you pictures of have basically closed with the promoter saying you can't sell guns there so i went back and this time shooting the video from the united corps but indeed they have absolutely no gun sales but everybody has congregated about 150 feet up against the building. he was relocated about a 32nd flock. the other thing that happened, and jamie was kind enough to mention they were kind of winding down the office in the city of new york sent a team of private detectives out and we talked to cameras and we talked on how to try to avoid detection and talked about some gun shows we might want to go to. i had one guy walking around with a camera and these guys were pros. the allies and the years of engagement that said you can't talk to anybody but they were not so hampered and the shot a video and i'm going to show it to you. >> i'm going to let this speak for itself. >> i need to see your id. >> no background c
or not these types of droughts and events have occurred in the past, they have. and as a result, the laws of chance simply tell us that they will happen again spent before we get to the policy question, this kind of goes with what we just addressed here, and margaret, you're a case study, and this is a question from alan. is question is, are you aware of any case studies where particular communities actually did take a proactive approach for drought management, and where it worked and where we could take a case -- take a look at the case study and applied elsewhere? >> well, i guess i would have to go back to historic times, because as i mentioned before i worked with navajo communities and so i know a lot about the way people coped with drought before reservation lands were established. and one of the things that people did was they were more aware of how the ecosystem operated, and would move according to what the current conditions work. they would move their livestock so they were more flexible, and the permitting systems and the types of things we have in place now as far as land tenure and wh
to process and grow food that is either where the laws are weaker than they can have an easier time dictating policy and increasingly, who's been produced in these countries. if you're talking about organic, it's very difficult to get organic products that are meeting standards. as you can imagine how this is happening in places like china. so what we are advocating and the reason that i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more. it is great for the local foods movement, we have our farm and we love people coming out, but we don't envision that our farm or all of the small farmers market in the area are ever going to be able to really feed the entire population. because you have to be able to distribute these products. the distribution has a stranglehold. so we need to have antitrust laws added to our agenda. and it's beyond the fun things that we all enjoy. we believe there are things even with this dysfunctional congress, we need to jumpstart the conversation about these issues. we live in a system that's supposed to be based on competition. all public policies promote and allow deregula
the company knows you don't bowl, you don't cut your own law. it's merely covering the track so is that what it knows doesn't seem so spooky. all right. let me finish with another question. i actually like the way i'm finishing. are there are good things about statistics, scary things about statistics, and then there are places where we're watching unfold right now in real-time. this is some of the most interesting stuff. one of the questions at the end of the book is how can we identify and reward good teachers and schools? my wife is a public school math teacher. so she has has been involved in this realm. we need good schools and we need good teachers in order to have good schools. it follows logically we ought to reward good teachers and good schools and firing bad teachers and closing bad schools. how do we do that? test scores give us an objective measure of student performance, yet we know that some students will do much better on a standardized test for other reasons that have nothing to do with what is going on inside the classroom or the school. the seemingly simple solution is to
pay some poor kenyan for some? so it's been that kind of situation. >> host: you've been to law e, texas, kansas for your research on this and now you are in kenya when does the research part of it in the? >> guest: you just know when you get there. actually the research never ends. there is a point i say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sur
instead of 2004, in 1989, as he is going off to boston, correct, the harvard law school. >> guest: yes. >> host: so to barack obama is finally going to make and appeared in your book. is this about halfway through the book? >> guest: not halfway. it's 164 pages into it. >> host: we get to hawaii. again, how did his parents meet? >> guest: well, his mother was 17. she was a freshman at the university of hawaii. >> host: i apologize to take it one step back. how did she get to hawaii? >> guest: she got to hawaii because her father, put in a furniture salesman in mercer island, or in seattle, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. and he was always looking for the next thing. principally moved west. from california to california. to seattle and then from seattle to hawaii. and so she came along with the family. she was only 17 and she graduate from high school, and actual public school in seattle post might only child. >> guest: and she was the only child. her name was stanley in. his name was stanley. i can tell you the story about some other time. in any case, so she is
. but we are not in the business of making law. we also have an instinct for wanting to have access. so there's a distinction between, for example, supporting the concept of copyrights and whether they should last 85 years or longer. and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold. these are really serious questions. because suddenly we have locked up in every library in america books that are not being sold that a lot of people would like to have access to, if it was free. and that's for digitization basically provides. and so to some degree people are going to have to come to grips with it. there's a secondary issue, by the way, in terms of the visual arts, where artists, families for extended periods of times have copyright in effect, powe powers, over great works of art. and how long that should last is a really powerful question. i will tell you as someone who came from a legislative background, that fairly narrow commercial interests really dictated a process during a particular period of time. i doubt if exactly the same decisions on extendin
that part of it comes from if you put one of the laws of school education is that white children are an inferior schools. >> host: there's action. >> guest: there's action and that is one of the things about this segregation is that many black parents understand if they get their kids into school with white kids they have leverage. one of the problems is the way in which we went about desegregation is that i agree we should have had -- that kid should have been allowed to go to central high school but what about the 900 of the first bill in the all blacks cool? what is being done to make sure that their education as equal because that would have cost a lot of money and a lot of resources and that is where the nation failed. yes we need to break down the racial barriers and make it possible to have an all white school but that still doesn't happen to deal with the problems that happen. >> host: in boston in the 70's some of it, the busing in michael foot court-ordered busing. we didn't allow our children to go to school with white kids because we wanted to integrate. they go to th
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8